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Be on top of the game with the flagship D6

Nikon’s new powerhouse DSLR sets new heights in imaging accuracy and communication speed JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA – Speed is key in the world of sports and photojournalism. The new Nikon D6, announced by Nikon in South Africa today, makes the mark in Nikon’s history with its most powerful autofocus to capture the decisive moments, and delivers them with fast and versatile communication options so those winning shots swiftly make it to the news-desk or social media with just a few taps. Be it from an all-selectable 105-point autofocus (AF) employing cross sensors in high density sensor arrangement, to simultaneous recordings of JPEG images to both slots, and even to produce natural skin tones with utmost clarity, the flagship camera is ready to impress even the most gruelling demands of the industry. Low lights and challenging environments of harsh stadium lights will benefit from an ISO sensitivity of 102400. Track the action in conventionally difficult scenes such as multiple subjects in the frame with the new AF engine, while also catching it all with approximately 14-fps1 high speed continuous shooting. Discover workflow flexibility with prioritised image upload together with versatile data transfer capabilities. “We want to provide a photography experience that […]
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BOKEH FOR BEGINNERS

Bokeh comes from the Japanese word boke (ボケ), which means ‘blur’ or ‘haze’—or boke-aji, the ‘blur quality.’ Bokeh is pronounced BOH-Kə or BOH-kay. Visit any photography website or forum and you’ll find plenty of debate on the pleasing bokeh that user’s favourite fast lenses allow. The adjectives flow thick and fast: smooth, incredible, superb, good, beautiful, sweet, silky, excellent …but what exactly is bokeh? Bokeh can be defined as ‘the effect of a soft out-of-focus background that you get when shooting a subject using a fast lens at the widest aperture.’ Simply put, bokeh is the pleasing or aesthetic quality of out-of-focus blur in a photograph. Although bokeh is actually a characteristic of a photograph, the lens used determines the shape and size of the visible bokeh. Usually seen more in highlights, bokeh is affected by the shape of the diaphragm blades (the aperture) of the lens. A lens with more circular-shaped blades will have rounder, softer orbs of out-of-focus highlight. A lens with an aperture that is more hexagonal in shape will recreate that shape in the highlights it captures. © Jody Dole, Bokeh is easily seen in the foreground and background.  ACHIEVING BOKEH IN YOUR IMAGES To achieve […]
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5 EASY PHOTOGRAPHY COMPOSITION GUIDELINES

You may not realise this, but every time you bring your camera up to your eye you’re making decisions about composition. Simply put, composition is how you choose to frame the picture you’re about to make. Many books have been written about composition. And while no two people are likely to frame the same scene the same way, there are some general guidelines that can help you make your photos more interesting and engaging. THE RULE OF THIRDS The rule of thirds is a guide to help you show your subject off to best effect. When you look through your viewfinder or at the LCD monitor screen on your camera, it helps to imagine a noughts-and-crosses grid over the scene. The grid segments the image into nine squares, which are created by superimposing four lines over what you can see. Note that some Nikon cameras even have a menu option that allows you to turn on gridlines in the viewfinder (or on the screen). These gridlines are a guide to help you frame your image and won’t show up in your final picture. Notice where the four lines intersect. The rule of thirds suggests that these intersection points are the […]
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Tips for Capturing Silhouettes

Silhouettes are all about photographing a subject in front of a light source and persuading your camera to expose for the brightest part of the image – the background – so your subject is sufficiently underexposed that it appears blacked out. Silhouettes work beautifully with the vibrant colours of sunset, or against dramatic starry or moonlit skies, and they also bring depth and foreground interest to the Christmas and New Year fireworks displays which are now becoming increasingly popular. Whatever the background, you need to meter and correctly expose for that background in order to place your subject in shadow. Check on the LCD how the image looks, and adjust your exposure accordingly. You can also use exposure bracketing to shoot a series of shots with varied exposures, and then pick the best one. The ideal spot on which to focus is the subject. However, since the subject of a silhouette is so dark, the camera may have difficulty locking on the focus. Here’s what you can do to deal with this: Manually focus the camera on your subject. Focus on the subject’s edge, where there will be more of a contrast difference between the darkened subject and the brighter […]
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Making your flat lay photos pop

Flat lay has taken the world of photography by storm. When the word “photography” is mentioned, what comes to mind? We bet it’s not a flat lay image. However, with the perfect planning, you can capture a flat lay that can be just as eye-catching and visually appealing. Below are some basic steps for taking flat lay photos like a boss. WHAT MAKES A FLAT LAY? Simply put, flat lay is a photograph taken from right above. An establishing characteristic is its bird’s eye point of view, allowing you to capture all the elements in one picture. Another characteristic is the charming minimalist style each flat lay image exudes. But why do some flat lays look like they are cut from a Vanity Fair magazine, while others feel like randomly scattered items on a floor? The secret is in the message. Before setting up, you have to think thoroughly about the purpose of this photoshoot. Is it to tell a story, to convey an emotion, to visualize a message, or to set up the tone and expectation for more content? Photographed with D800 and the AF NIKKOR 50mm f/1.8D at 50mm, ISO 125, f/14, 1/2s Photographed with D800 and the […]
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Free your creativity with Abstract photography

What is abstract photography? Also known as conceptual, experimental or non-objective photography, it’s difficult to sum up with a single definition. Lines, textures, patterns, colours and all types of graphic qualities can be used to create an image that doesn’t aim to illustrate reality but form a unique image from conventional subject matter. You may hardly, if at all, make a connection between an abstract photograph and the object world, but that’s why it can be so mesmerising — anything can become a magnificent piece of art. Shift your focus away from usual perspectives, observe the world, and concentrate on components with a macro lens. Sounds tricky? Here are some tips for recognising abstract photography opportunities. YOUR EYES CAN FEEL You can connect to one’s sense of touch with images of texture. Spend some time looking at surfaces around you, from nearby items like the shell of your laptop, to fine art like oil painting on a canvas. Every surface has a unique texture waiting to be explored. Take a few test shots to see how the convex and concave appear on an image, and more importantly, study which direction the light comes from. The dimensions and topography of a […]
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Why shoot mirrorless?

As a Nikon representative, I get asked a lot, “why should I shoot mirrorless?” with the majority of users already expecting the usual answers of: “Without the mirror box, the body is so much smaller and lighter” “Getting instant feedback about the colours and exposure through the Electronic Viewfinder leads to a much easier shooting experience” “The autofocus technology when shooting video is generally smoother and easier to use than with a DSLR” And while all of that is true when shooting mirrorless, the major benefit that I’m seeing with the Nikon Z Series comes down to the lenses and the fact that I am getting image quality like I have never seen before. Now if you’re reading this and you’ve never shot with a NIKKOR Z lens before, please don’t think that I’m saying that all of your amazing F mount DSLR lenses should be thrown out and that they’re useless…that’s the furthest thing from the truth, as not only are they some of the best lenses ever made for a DSLR, but also the Nikon Mount Adapter FTZ makes using older F mount glass so seamless that you don’t even realize it’s there. Ninety F mount NIKKOR lenses are fully compatible […]
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FTZ Mount Adapter

Superb glass never goes out of style. Great glass endures. That’s why Nikon cameras—from the Nikon F in 1959 all the way to D850—have remained compatible with nearly all F-mount NIKKOR lenses. Why would things be any different with the Nikon Z? The Mount Adapter FTZ lets you keep shooting the lenses you know and love while also gaining the benefits of the new Z system. The legacy of compatibility continues. Teach your favorite lenses some new tricks. Proven optics meet the latest imaging advancements. On a Z camera with the Mount Adapter FTZ, compatible F-Mount NIKKOR lenses retain all of their sharpness and superb rendering power. Plus, they gain so much—smooth, fast Hybrid-AF*, silent shooting, breakthrough low-light performance, the benefits of the camera’s built-in VR image stabilization and more.*Full AF/AE supported when using AF-S D/E, AF-P type G/E, AF-I type D and AF-S/AF-I teleconverters. Steadier than ever. On a Z camera, every lens has VR. For the first time, you can experience fast aperture NIKKOR primes like the AF-S NIKKOR 105mm f/1.4E ED or AF-S NIKKOR 24mm f/1.4G ED with up to 5 stops of 3-axis VR image stabilization. NIKKOR lenses that already have VR, like the AF-S NIKKOR 70-200mm f/2.8E FL […]
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Simple Wireless Sharing of Photos and Videos with the Z 50

It’s easy to get images onto your compatible smartphone with the SnapBridge app and your Z 50 mirrorless camera.   Sharing your photos and videos with the Nikon Z 50 is quick and easy. All you need is your camera, compatible smartphone or tablet and the free Nikon SnapBridge app which can be found on the Apple App Store and Google Play store. Just download the app onto your iPhone® or iPad® or smart device running on the Android™ operating system and follow the prompts to pair the camera via Bluetooth and Wi-Fi®. Once you pair the Z 50 and your smartphone or tablet, you can download photos and videos to your device for speedy sharing to your favourite social media sites or by text or email. The SnapBridge app even lets you control your camera remotely so you can take photos or start and stop video capture. There are options for downloading a recommended smaller sized image file or the full-sized image. Nikon’s even got an image sharing site, Nikon Image Space, that gives you 20 Gigs of storage free when you sign up for a Nikon ID and register your Nikon camera. Once you’ve downloaded images to your smart device you can quickly share […]
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Start a Photography Project for the New Year

2020 is here – so what better time to set yourself some new photo challenges for the New Year? If you’re short on inspiration, try our ideas for size. Time-based projects 365 days This is a hardy perennial – take a photograph every day for a whole year. To keep it fresh and interesting, vary what you shoot, from landscapes to street scenes, portraits to details, pets to abstracts. To keep you focused, pledge to upload each day’s image to social media, so you build up a gallery of your work. Not only will it be great to get feedback, but you’ll also be able to see at a glance how you improve over the year with so much practice. 52 weeks This is similar, but you take one image a week instead. You might choose to have a different theme each week or month, perhaps tied in with the season. You’ll still get to track your progress over the year, but you don’t have to commit quite as much time to it, so if you’re a busy person, this could be perfect for you. 1 day Pick a particular day, and make an image every hour between getting up […]
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