MENU

Photographing the Supermoon

Tips by Brendon Cremer  With the supermoon coming up I would like to offer a few tips on how to get the best results whist photographing it. Equipment you will need A good sturdy tripod A high resolution DSLR camera (the higher resolution the better) A telephoto lens (the longer the better, and a teleconverter if your lens can take one) A remote shutter release is advisable Tips Set your camera and lens up on the tripod, preferably in an area with the least amount of light poloution If you do not have a remote shutter release cable, I would suggest setting your camera to a 2 or 10 second timer delay mode. The idea here is to minimise camera shake as much as possible Turn the vibration reduction or image stabilisation off on the lens, as this is       not going to help much at all and can cause slight focus issues. Set your camera mode to Manual as you want to fully control the exposure. Set your ISO, I find 100 or 200 is a good place to start. You may need to increase the ISO a little later, if the shutter speed is too slow. […]
Read More ›

How to use Live View on your Nikon D-SLR

Live View shooting mode is essentially what it says on the tin – you’re seeing what the camera’s lens is seeing, and what the sensor is recording, but on the LCD rather than through the optical viewfinder. Live View is activated by either a switch or an ‘Lv’ button on the camera body. It enables you to view and compose the shot on the LCD screen, enabling you to shoot with the camera at an unusual angle or away from your body. Plus, it enables you to check the effects of settings such as white balance, colour processing and exposure which you can’t see in the viewfinder. And it’s terrific for precision focusing, as it enables you to check all areas of the subject for sharpness by using the magnifying function on the LCD, then correct any dodgy areas by manual focusing adjustments. DSLR phase-detection AF sensors are blocked whenever a camera raises its reflex mirror to expose the imaging sensor, and this is what happens in Live View’s handheld mode. Since the imaging sensor constantly streams data for the LCD display during Live View, the mirror must be continuously held up while Live View is in use. When you press […]
Read More ›

Introduce your kids to photography

It’s the summer holidays – so what better time to get the kids interested in taking their own pictures? Try our advice to help them get snapping in style… The basics Make sure they’re holding the camera level and steady (elbows tucked in, holding it in both hands, leaning against something if they can). Remind them to keep things simple by filling the frame with their subject as much as possible, to reduce distracting elements. Get them used to checking what’s in the frame before they press the shutter, so they can avoid the usual beginner error of trees growing out of people’s heads. Encourage them to shoot with the camera on its side as well as in landscape mode, for vertical shots that are great for portraits, trees and buildings (and giraffes). Now get them experimenting with… Taking lots of pictures Back in the day when we had to buy film and processing was expensive, the tendency was to hold back on shooting. These digital days, that’s no longer an issue, and it’s great news for learners of all ages, as they can shoot away and see their results immediately, so their learning curve can be a lot quicker. […]
Read More ›

Top Tips for Taking Photos of Sunsets

Sunsets are one of the most popular photography subjects, and the great thing about them is that they keep on giving. Even after the sun has dipped below the horizon, the twilight afterglow that lights up the sky 20 or so minutes later can yield truly beautiful results. Try our tips for making the most of these magical moments. A handy way of anticipating a promising sunset is to look at the clouds: high, spotty clouds with lots of space between them are ideal, as each separate cloud will grab a little bit of light and colour and create a visually pleasing scene. Sheets of clouds are not a good sign! Another indication of a decent sunset is often a rainy day – if the rainclouds start to clear around sunset, you could be onto a winning shot. With any sunset shot, you’ve got to react quickly – you’ll have maybe 20 minutes to make something happen, and from one minute to the next the photo can be dramatically different because of the way the light reflects off different things and how its intensity changes. The key is setting up in advance, because if you’re mucking around with your tripod […]
Read More ›

How to take Beautiful Portraits on your Holidays

Composition Check in the LCD screen or against the crop marks in the viewfinder that body parts haven’t been accidentally amputated, or that trees and signs aren’t growing out of heads; you might need to move slightly so you can recompose to prevent this. Turn the camera on its side for full-length shots, and never be afraid to move in close – frame-filling portraits can be very effective. Take care with focus to ensure the eyes are sharp, otherwise the picture won’t work. Lenses A lens with a focal length around 18-135mm is ideal for most portraits. Get too close with a wideangle and you’ll start to distort facial features, making noses and chins appear larger; a medium telephoto lens setting of around 70-135mm creates a more flattering result. For candids of the kids that won’t disturb their fun, try the long end of a telephoto zoom – you can shoot from a safe distance, and the focal length will create shallow depth of field that focuses all attention on your subject, with distracting backgrounds and foreground softened into a pleasing blur. Light Daylight gives the best results for portraits. Late afternoon sunlight has a warm glow, while cloudy, overcast […]
Read More ›

Video Composition Rules: Establishing, Medium and Close-up Shots

Composition is how you choose to frame the video you’re about to capture; and composition is just as important for video as it is for still photography. Rule of Thirds One of the most basic composition rules is the Rule of Thirds. When you look through at your subjects, using Live View on the LCD screen, imagine a tic-tac-toe grid over the scene. Notice where these lines intersect. The rule of thirds suggests that these intersection points are the ideal places to position your subject. Doing so will generally result in a pleasant and balanced composition. Try moving your camera so your subject appears where two of the lines meet. The subject doesn’t have to be directly on the intersection but somewhere close to it. Try a couple of different compositions to find the one you like best. Establishing Shots, Medium Shots, Close-up Shots When shooting video, you want to vary the types of shots for a more interesting feel. There are three types of shots that you’ll always see in videos and movies from big Hollywood productions to commercials and even wedding or occasion videos. The Establishing shots are the wide shots. It allows the viewer to take in […]
Read More ›

Nature’s Best Photography Africa 2017

GLOBAL PHOTOGRAPHERS PRESENT AFRICA IN ALL HER GLORY As the exclusive camera partner to this prestigious event, Nikon in South Africa is proud to announce that Cape Town visitors and residents will once again be treated to an annual exhibition of breath-taking, African focused photographs coordinated by Nature’s Best Photography Africa and Iziko Museums of South Africa. The exhibition featuring a total of 75 award winning photographs that were taken in Africa by global photographers will run at the Iziko SA Museum from 8th November until the 4th of March 2018. An expert panel of local and international judges, considered thousands of images to select the winners. The winners competed for prizes made up of photographic safaris to some of Africa’s richest wildlife regions with a combined value in excess of R1 million. This is the largest prize value of any nature photography competition in the world and is made possible by the kind support of & Beyond, Chobe Safari Lodge and CNP Safari’s. The exhibition aims to foster a love for and desire to protect the natural resources of Africa amongst all segments of our population and those who visit our continent. We would like to encourage schools, parents, […]
Read More ›

Moviemaking 101 – 6 Tips On How To Make A Video

Follow these six tips for a better movie making experience with your Nikon HDSLR: Pre-production planning. A Hollywood movie never begins shooting without all aspects of the film being planned out in the pre-production stage. Take a tip from the pros and plan out the story you want to tell using video. It can be as simple as writing out a shot list (a list of shots you want to capture); a simple outline; the dialog you wish to capture; or it can be more formal, with a script and storyboard (illustrating your movie shot by shot). This way you can keep track of what you’ve shot and what is remaining. This lets you make sure that you don’t forget to capture any important footage when you make your video. Capture a variety of shots. Telling a story will be more interesting if you’re capturing a variety of shots. The best videos are made of short clips edited together. In the film world the wide angle shot is known as the Establishing Shot and it shows the overall scene. Medium shots often include one or more subjects. Close-up shots can be cropped at the head and shoulders like a portrait, […]
Read More ›

How to use Focus Tracking to capture moving subjects

  Moving subjects – like birds in flight or dogs chasing after a ball – are more difficult to keep in focus than static ones using the standard (auto) autofocus mode. While auto AF mode can alternate between single and continuous autofocus when it identifies a moving subject, selecting continuous AF mode (AF-C) will give more consistent results. AF-C enables you to keep the focus bang on track, focusing on your subject continuously all the while the shutter-release button is half-depressed. Here’s how to get set with AF-C: Choose AF-C by holding down the AF-mode button on the front left of the camera and simultaneously rotating the main command dial until you see ‘AF-C’ in the viewfinder or on the control panel. Choose the focus point position: flick the focus selector lock on the back panel down from ‘L’ to the small dot. Use the multi-selector arrows to choose the focus point you want, and press OK, then flick the selector lock back up to ‘L’ to stop the focus point changing next time the multi-selector is pressed (for example, during image playback). Now quickly compose your shot and half-depress the shutter. As long as the button stays half-depressed, your […]
Read More ›

Experimenting with lightning photography

Lightning is the occurrence of a natural electrical discharge between clouds or between a cloud and the ground. Generated in electrically-charged storm systems, temperatures of lightning bolts is hotter than the surface of the sun and can therefore be very dangerous. While lightning is a terrifying natural phenomena, it is also one of the most beautiful. Lightning storms are unpredictable and can strike anytime and anywhere so trying to get a photograph can be quite a challenge, but not impossible. Safety First While capturing lightning can be a very rewarding experience, it is also important to keep yourself safe from harm. To determine whether lightning is near you, try to listen for thunder. If you do hear the sounds of a thunder, it is advisable to go indoors. If your hair starts to stand on ends or if your skin starts to tingle, there is a high chance that lightning may be about to strike. Do not photograph lightning in open areas, especially where water, tall trees, or structures are nearby. Preparation is key Once you’ve found a lightning storm that is happening near you, try to look for a spot that will give you a good view of the […]
Read More ›