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How to take great images in low light

Photography is all about using light to paint a picture, and low light photography is no exception. In situations where light is limited, it can be a little trickier to capture a high-quality, sharp image – but don’t let this put you off! With the right know-how, you can capture stunning shots in any given low light situation. Try out these tips and get creative with your low light photography: When shooting with slower shutter speeds, make sure you either have a sturdy tripod or are able to rest the camera on a solid surface. Hand shake will become obvious when the shutter is open for longer periods, resulting in a blurry image. To obtain the sharpest possible image when using a tripod, use a remote trigger to release the shutter – and don’t forget to turn off the VR on the lens. Consider using the ‘MUP’ function, or in the latest generation of D-SLRs the ‘Electronic Front Shutter Curtain’ feature on the camera, to minimise any possible movement. This will prevent the vibration that occurs when the mirror moves up and down, which can cause the image to have a slight blur. In order to make interesting abstract images, […]
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Using a tripod

Tripods were absolutely essential in the early days of photography, when exposures were made on glass plates with sensitivity as low as just ISO 1-3. These days, with many Nikon cameras able to capture a black cat in a coal cellar hand-held, thanks to the incredible leaps ISO capability has made, you might be thinking, do I really need a tripod? But the answer is still ‘yes’ for many types of images and situations – find out why in our comprehensive guide… So why use a tripod? Tripods come in handy for many different reasons – read on to find out when you might need one…. Sharper images The more pixels your camera’s sensor packs, the more likely it is that tiny movements will be recorded as blur in your shots, so with a high-megapixel DSLR such as the D810, it’s definitely worth using it tripod-mounted at anything under 1/125sec. Even at fast shutter speeds, blur is less likely with the camera rock-steady on a tripod (always using a cable release to fire the shutter) – and the larger you’re intending to display your image, the more important this becomes. Spot-on composition Using a tripod slows you down a bit, […]
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7 Tips for Architecture Images with Impact

1) Don’t worry about having to spend a fortune on gear You’ll be surprised at what you can achieve with what you’ve already got, although you will need a wideangle lens to fill the frame. A telephoto lens is great for concentrating on details like ornate carvings, clocks, plaques, signage and repeating patterns of roof tiles or windows. 2) Use the camera tripod-mounted This gives you a bit of breathing space to concentrate on composition, and allows for shake-free longer exposures – although for interiors, you might need a monopod, as tripods are often banned inside buildings. Otherwise, dial up the ISO so you can use a faster shutter speed, and shoot hand-held. 3) Planning is key Check out images of your chosen buildings online to look for good angles and the way the light falls at different times of the day. A quick recce before you set up can reveal the best vantage points, and it’s a lot quicker and easier to walk around with the camera handheld, rather than when it’s tripod-mounted. 4) Converging verticals Where walls that should look parallel instead appear to be sloping inwards towards their apex – can be a problem. You can minimise […]
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How to do light painting photography

Light painting is a fun photography technique that can put a unique spin on your images. It is the art of using handheld light sources to draw or selectively illuminate parts of a scene while the shutter of your camera is left opened. This technique dates back to 1889 when Étienne-Jules Marey and Georges Demeny attached incandescent bulbs to the joints of an assistant to trace human motion and created the first known light painting photograph, “Pathological Walk from in Front”. MASTER THE BASICS If you are new to photography, experimenting with light painting can be a great way to learn how to shoot in manual mode. By shooting in a dark environment during a long exposure, the light trails or streaks of the light source will be captured in your image. Light painting requires a slow shutter speed, such as one second or more. A variety of light sources can also be used, from simple flashlights to glow sticks, candles, and even fireworks. TAKE PRECAUTIONS When dealing with flammable equipment, please ensure that you stay clear of anything that can easily catch fire. Wear protective clothing, cover your hair, and keep your camera gear away from the flames. Always […]
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A Quick guide to using the Fn (function) button

Customise your shooting experience at the touch of a button with the Fn (function) button.You can set up your Nikon DSLR so your favourite setting is selectable simply by pressing the Fn button – usually located on the front of the DSLR. Depending on your camera model, you may have the option to set up other customisable buttons for even more versatility. Assigning the Fn function This is a very straightforward procedure: 1. Go into the Custom Setting Menu. 2. Select Controls and Assign Fn Button. 3. Select Press to bring up a menu of the different roles and functions that can be assigned to the Fn button. 4. Choose your setting and press OK. 5. That function will be now be implemented whenever you press the Fn button – and, of course, you can update your choice at any time. There are many different options you can assign to the Fn button, including: AE/AF lock – locks focus and exposure Flash off – prevents the flash from firing Viewfinder Grid Display – turns the framing grid on and off Viewfinder Virtual Horizon – displays a virtual horizon to help ensure your camera is level Playback – useful for situations […]
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A Quick Guide to Flat Lay Photography

A flat lay is simply an image shot directly from above – a bird’s eye view of an array of carefully arranged objects – and it’s never been more popular, particularly in food and fashion photography. Use our tips to ensure top flat-lay shots. Tell a story The best flat lays tell a visual story, so choose a theme, using a couple of ‘star’ items surrounded by a ‘supporting cast’ of additional elements. Go for harmonious, complementary colours, and keep things simple – less is often more. The most popular format for flat lays is square, and within that square you want to be aiming for a clean, easy-to-read composition. Whether you go for a square, portrait or landscape format, use the rule of thirds to guide you – imagine a noughts and crosses grid overlaying the image, and position the most important elements roughly where the gridlines intersect. Create the background Choose your flat-lay’s backdrop with care. Plain white is very popular and often extremely effective, but don’t be afraid to experiment with different colours and textures, such as wood, corkboard, fabric, wallpaper – whatever matches the theme of your flat lay. Get the light right Natural daylight gives […]
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A Guide to Shooting Wirelessly with your D-SLR

There are times when, much as you love your Nikon camera, you don’t want to be anywhere near it… We are, of course, talking about situations where you want to fire the shutter or control your DSLR and even transfer images all from a healthy distance – perhaps when you are photographing wildlife, or if you’re shooting an event where you need multiple cameras firing in tandem. Here are the solutions Nikon has to offer. Via infrared signals with the Nikon ML-3 or ML-L3 remote controls If you’re shooting a subject in direct line of sight, you can use either the ML-L3 or ML-3 remotes (depending on your camera), which use a beam of infrared light to trigger the camera. The range on the ML-L3 is around 5m from remote to camera, while the ML-3’s range is roughly 8m. Via radio signal with the Nikon Wireless Remote Controller Set and WR-1 remote controller The Wireless Remote Controller kit includes the WR-R10 transceiver (controller) which is attached to the DSLR and receives signals from the WR-T10 transmitter. Alternatively, you could use multiple WR-1 remote controllers, which are both transmitter and transceiver in one. Because these systems use radio frequencies instead of […]
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New NIKKOR lenses to capture your world in its entirety

Empowering photographers to capture bold and dramatic visions with extreme clarity through the NEW AF-P DX NIKKOR 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6G VR, AF-S Fisheye NIKKOR 8-15mm f/3.5-4.5E ED and AF-S NIKKOR 28mm f/1.4E ED Johannesburg, South Africa – 31 May 2017 Offering enhanced perspectives to inspire and enable photographers in the pursuit of imaging perfection, the AF-P DX NIKKOR 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6G VR, AF-S Fisheye NIKKOR 8-15mm f/3.5-4.5E ED and AF-S NIKKOR 28mm f/1.4E ED are the newest additions to the extensive array of NIKKOR lenses. The trio of lenses, announced today by Nikon in South Africa, include a fisheye zoom and two wide-angle lenses. The AF-P DX NIKKOR 10-20mm f/4.5-5.6G VR, made for visual aesthetes on the go, packs superior optical performance into a compact, lightweight body for exquisite wide-angle and close-up shots. Photographers looking for an added creative edge can turn to the AF-S Fisheye NIKKOR 8-15mm f/3.5-4.5E ED, a fisheye zoom lens that delivers remarkable interpretations of a scene and offers a distinct perspective to photographers. Rounding off with the AF-S NIKKOR 28mm f/1.4E ED, landscapes and portraits are replicated in their true form, offering an angle of view similar to that of the human eye. “With over 90 types […]
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Made for the great outdoors: COOLPIX W300 is ready for adventures

The new Nikon COOLPIX compact camera goes down to the sea with a waterproof depth of 30m, survives falls of up to 2.4m, weathers the cold temperatures down to -10°C, and manages a dustproof ruggedness to get right into those adrenaline-filled quests. Johannesburg, South Africa – 31 May 2017 The release of the high-performance and tough COOLPIX W300 has been announced by Nikon Middle East FZE. today. Waterproof down to 30m and withstanding shock from falls as high as 2.4m, the new COOLPIX is ready for greater performance in both form and function with the inclusion of 4K UHD movie recording capability. “Fitting right into the traveller’s backpack in a compact and durable form is the new W300 with its extensive range of functions. The camera compatibly gets into action in the terrains of land and water with its waterproof, shockproof, dustproof and cold-resistant properties, and is ready to tough it out to preserve your moments in both quality stills and 4K UHD videos,” said Grant Norton, Head of Sales and Marketing for Nikon in South Africa. COOLPIX W300 Primary Features Trusted companion on land and in water: For those with a recreational diver’s license equivalent to the PADI’s Advanced […]
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3D Photography

In 3D photography, you need two images, one for the left eye and one from the right. There are two common methods when shooting 3D. The first one is to take stereoscopic images taken from two camera viewpoints. Image by Matjaž Tančič The distance between two cameras need to be around 6.4 cm, the average distance between human eyes. Syncing both cameras to shoot and flash at the same time is not easy, testing for triggering options is key. The settings for both cameras have to be the same, so it is best to shoot with manual and have a zoom lens, preferably not too wide or narrow. The AF-S NIKKOR 24-70mm f/2.8G ED works well. Small aperture is crucial: F5,6; F8; F11. Depending on how far or close objects are, recalculate and change distances between cameras. If you are shooting something close like a table top, a centimeter between cameras is enough but if you want depth, for example clouds that are far away, you need distance between cameras. Another method, and the most frequently used is the cha-cha method. For people who just want to start, this is the easiest as you only shoot with one camera and […]
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